Crop Science Centre - Driven by impact, fuelled by excellence

Crop Science Centre

Driven by impact, fuelled by excellence

Join us at the Crop Science Centre Virtual Launch

Join us at the Crop Science Centre Virtual Launch

News
launch

Crop Science Centre Virtual Launch with Professor Giles Oldroyd and Dr Tina Barsby

We are hugely excited by the Centre’s potential to conduct world-leading research in global food security, and hope you can join us for this very special launch event.   

Please register your place here. If you are interested but unable to attend, a recording of the event will be made available online. If you have any questions please contact us at  info@cropsciencecentre.org

16.00pm BST Welcome from Professor Stephen J Toope, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge

16.10pm BST Introduction and discussion chaired by Dr Rob Doubleday (CSaP). How research and innovation can revolutionise agriculture, with Professor Giles Oldroyd (Director, Crop Science Centre), Dr Tina Barsby (CEO, NIAB) and Sir David Baulcombe (Royal Society Research Professor)

16.35pm BST Q&A

16.45pm BST Close

Crop Science Centre

Driven by impact, fuelled by excellence

Department of Plant Sciences NEWS: A plant's diet, surviving in a variable nutrient environment

Department of Plant Sciences NEWS: A plant's diet, surviving in a variable nutrient environment

Research
root responses

Giles Oldroyd and Ottoline Leyser’s review on nutrient sensing in the root and systemic signalling in the shoot to respond to changeable nutrient availability. Their article provides a detailed overview of the current knowledge about how plants engage with their nutrients and provides ideas about future research directions to help us use this knowledge to increase crop plant performance in low-fertility soils and wean global agriculture from its dependency on inorganic fertilisers. Read the review: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/368/6486/eaba0196

 

Image: N response and signaling. Root responses of Arabidopsis plants grown in uniform high N (NO3–; dark gray, left), uniform low N (light gray, middle), and differential treatments of high and low N (right). Note how the root responses are opposite to the local treatments in uniform versus differential treatments. Underpinning these responses are C-terminally encoded peptides (CEPs) produced in roots experiencing low N, cytokinins produced in roots experiencing high N, and an N-sufficiency signal in the shoot. All regulate shoot-to-root signaling, which involves CEP DOWNSTREAM 1 (CEPD) peptides. Systemic signaling is integrated with local signaling (indicated by red) that is induced by local perception of NO3–.

 

Crop Science Centre

Driven by impact, fuelled by excellence

Crop Science Centre NEWS: Achieving global food security - a vision for the new Crop Science Centre

Crop Science Centre NEWS: Achieving global food security - a vision for the new Crop Science Centre

News
Crop Science Centre

The Crop Science Centre features in the impact stories of Dear World... Yours, Cambridge, the campaign for the University and Colleges of Cambridge as the response of the University of Cambridge and the National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB)  to the increasingly pressing challenge of feeding people across the globe. Read more about how this was possible

Crop Science Centre

Driven by impact, fuelled by excellence

Professor Uta Paszkowski

Professor Uta Paszkowski


Uta Paszkowski is Professor of Plant Molecular Genetics at the Department of Plant Sciences of the University of Cambridge and leads the Cereal Symbiosis Group at the Crop Science Centre. She did her undergraduate studies at the University Cologne (Germany) gaining a Master (Diplom) degree in phytopathology at the Max-Planck Institute for Plant Breeding.

Publications

Crop Science Centre

Driven by impact, fuelled by excellence

Professor Giles E. D. Oldroyd

Professor Giles E. D. Oldroyd


Giles Oldroyd studies interactions between plants and beneficial micro-organisms, both bacteria and fungi, that aid in the uptake of nutrients from the environment, especially nitrogen and phosphorus. These microbial associations are intracellular, allowing tight control of nutrient exchange, with sources of carbon delivered to the microorganisms from the plant in exchange for nitrogen and phosphorus.

Publications

Professor Uta Paszkowski

“I am excited to further my research at the Crop Science Centre. Working as a woman and mother in the science arena for more than 25 years I value equality and flexibility, and above all authenticity. Diversity is a strength that enables scientific imagination to flourish to its full potential.”

Professor Giles Oldroyd

“I am proud to be both the director of this institution and an openly gay man. For me, turning up to work authentically is important for my scientific creativity. I hope my honesty about my sexuality empowers others to also be open about who they are.”

Professor Mario Caccamo

“At the Crop Science Centre we have the scientific breadth and track record to rapidly respond to one of the grand challenges of our time: growing enough nutritious food for an increasing population while reducing inputs and green house emissions.”

Sustainable food production for everyone

The Crop Science Centre is a coalition between the University of Cambridge, Department of Plant Sciences, and NIAB. This coalition focuses on translational research in crops with real-world impact. We combine the diverse skills and expertise of the University and NIAB, providing an environment for research excellence with the capability to apply discoveries to crop improvement in the field.

Our research is interdisciplinary and of global relevance. We strive to improve both staple crops such as maize, wheat and rice, but also the specific crops of relevance to small-holder farmers, particularly those in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The Centre provides leadership in crop sciences, with a creative and dynamic research culture, motivated by improvement of agriculture for the betterment of society.

Our mission

At the Crop Science Centre, we are generating crop plants that deliver sufficient food for everyone in a sustainable way

  • We deliver agricultural impact, using excellence in research
  • We strive for sustainability, reducing agricultural reliance on chemical inputs
  • We foster equality, valuing all members of our research community
  • We believe in equity, ensuring even the world’s poorest farmers can grow enough food

Years of research has provided a deep understanding of how plants function, creating opportunities to transform the way we produce our food.  I am motivated to improve the sustainability and the equity of food production worldwide

Professor Giles Oldroyd,
CSC Director

Professor Giles Oldroyd

“At the Crop Science Centre we have the scientific breadth and track record to rapidly respond to one of the grand challenges of our time: growing enough nutritious food for an increasing population while reducing inputs and green house emissions.”

Professor Mario Caccamo,
CEO and Director of NIAB

Professor Mario Caccamo

“We envisage that new CSC crop technologies will enable higher crop yields and lower environmental impact for crop-based food production – as well as contributing to improved dietary health.”

Sir David Baulcombe,
Royal Society Professor

Sir David Baulcombe